• October 23, 2014
  • 6:30 pm to 7:45 pm
  • Room 565 (5th Floor), CIIS, 1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
Add to Calendar 10/23/2014 6:30 pm 10/23/2014 7:45 pm America/Los_Angeles Asian Wisdom Traditions in the Contemporary Context, with Steven Goodman We are living in a time of tremendous opportunities for exploring the diverse wisdom traditions of Asia. In particular, Buddhism and its rich legacy of compassion based spiritual inquiry is now, more than ever, available for study and practice in the West. We will explore some exciting new developments in the study of Buddhism, which are sure to revolutionize the field, especially the role of large scale digitizing initiatives. Room 565 (5th Floor), CIIS, 1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 false MM/DD/YYYY

RSVP:

Please fill out the R.S.V.P. form to secure your spot. Guests are welcome!

ABOUT THE TALK

We are living in a time of tremendous opportunities for exploring the diverse wisdom traditions of Asia. In particular, Buddhism and its rich legacy of compassion based spiritual inquiry is now, more than ever, available for study and practice in the West.

We will explore some exciting new developments in the study of Buddhism, which are sure to revolutionize the field, especially the role of large scale digitizing initiatives.

This talk will include a brief info session on the Asian & Comparative Studies program.
 
ABOUT THE SPEAKER

Professor Steven D. GoodmanProfessor Steven Goodman, Research and Program Director for Asian and Comparative Studies (Philosophy and Religion Department, CIIS), received his Ph.D. (1984) in Far Eastern Studies from the University of Saskatchewan, Canada, under the famed Buddhist scholar Herbert Guenther. His research interests are Indo-Tibetan philosophy, Tibetan poetics, and Classical Tibetan Language. For the last 30 years he has lectured and given workshops in Europe, Asia, and the United States on Buddhist practice, working with Trauma, and so on.

In 1994, Steven was awarded a Rockefeller Fellowship at Rice University Center for Cultural Studies for the study of Tibetan mystical poetry. He is the co-editor of "Tibetan Buddhism: Reason and Revelation" (SUNY Press, 1992), a source book for the study of Tibetan philosophical and visionary literature, and contributor to "Tibetan Literary Arts" (Marit Cranmer, curator, Shang Shung Institute/Smith College, 2007). His forthcoming book is "The Buddhist Psychology of Awakening: An In-Depth Guide to Abhidharma" (Shambhala Publications).

He is a founding member of the Working Committee for The 84000 Project: Translating The Words of The Buddha (84000.co), which is an international non-profit group coordinating the translation of the Buddhist Canonical Corpus (Tripitaka) from Tibetan into English, and making them available for free download.

Location information:

Room 565 (5th Floor)
1453 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA 94103

Thursday, October 23rd, 6:30-7:45 p.m.

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