• September 24, 2014
  • 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
  • California Institute of Integral Studies, 1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103
Add to Calendar 09/24/2014 7:00 pm 09/24/2014 9:00 pm America/Los_Angeles Acid Test: LSD, Ecstasy, and the Power to Heal with Tom Shroder Provocative, informative, and wildly entertaining, ACID TEST is a timely and controversial take on the potential psychedelic renaissance that is changing lives, clinical trial by clinical trial. California Institute of Integral Studies, 1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103 false MM/DD/YYYY

Provocative, informative, and wildly entertaining, ACID TEST is a timely and controversial take on the potential psychedelic renaissance that is changing lives, clinical trial by clinical trial. 

While more than 20 million Americans, including 500,000 Iraq-Afghanistan military veterans, suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, there is hope: therapy assisted by psychedelic drugs has been shown to dramatically alleviate the horrific symptoms from this costly and debilitating disorder, and even more impressively, to drill down to the knotted roots of the affliction and untangle them in no more than a handful of sessions. Award-winning journalist Tom Shroder reports on the therapeutic powers of psychedelic drugs in ACID TEST: LSD, Ecstasy and the Power to Heal, focusing on the use of MDMA (better known as Ecstasy) in the treatment of Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, and the potential benefits that it represents for thousands of military servicemen and veterans, as well as ordinary people. 

Since the discovery of the profound alterations of consciousness caused by LSD in 1943, psychedelics have played a crucial role in the still-nascent quest to understand the link between mind and matter. From the beginning, compounds like LSD, psilocybin, mescaline and MDMA have astounded psychiatrists and researchers with their ability, to produce profound altered states that can permanently change the deep-seated compulsions behind disorders like alcoholism, drug addiction, depression and post-traumatic stress. But after two decades in which psychedelics became the most studied psychoactive drugs in history, their widespread abuse - and the cultural panic that resulted - prompted a backlash that shut down the promising research cold.

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