MSTCM Curriculum

Our curriculum offers you one of the most comprehensive educations in the field of Traditional Chinese Medicine. From the very beginning of the program, ACTCM emphasizes hands-on clinical training in conjunction with the study of theoretical material, allowing students to gain a strong foundation and knowledge base for their career. View our CIIS/ACTCM catalog for a comprehensive program overview.

Level I

Study the main theories of TCM, the medicinal uses of Chinese herbs, acupuncture points and needling techniques, and diagnostic skills. Observe patient-practitioner interactions in our clinic, learn patient intake and treatment principles, and complete your general science requirements, as well as introductory courses in biomedicine, Qigong and Tai Ji Quan.

Level II

Deepen your knowledge of advanced acupuncture technique, prepare herbal formulas, and begin to study western clinical medicine and TCM internal medicine. Work under faculty supervision in our clinic to assess patients' health, develop diagnoses, recommend Chinese herbs, and apply TCM therapies including Tui Na and Shiatsu massage.

Level III

Focus on specialized coursework, learn how to manage a TCM practice and collaborate with western medical practitioners, and develop fluency in research methodologies. Gain clinical autonomy in creating treatment plans and treating patients, and pursue your own interests on clinical rotations at our many internship sites. Prepare for your licensing and certification exams, develop your area of specialty, and build the professional relationships that will help you launch your practice.

Study Tracks

ACTCM offers various programs of study, or tracks, for pursuing your master's degree. This allows students to choose a pace for the program that fits with their lifestyle. The nature of the track system ensures that all students are guaranteed the classes they need to take for any given quarter and that students can see in advance which classes they will enroll in for each quarter.

Each track differs in the number of quarters required to complete the master's program and the number of days per week that a student can expect to attend classes. Those who need to complete general science requirements may need to add time onto their program of study. A detailed layout of each program of study is included here and admissions counselors can explain the tracks in more detail.

The MSTCM program takes approximately four years to complete if attending full-time, but we offer several scheduling options to enable you to earn your degree while balancing a full life.

Accelerated track: 9 semesters over 3 calendar years
Full-time track
: 12 semesters over 4 calendar years

Track # of Semesters
Accelerated 9
Standard Full-time 12

MSTCM Course Descriptions and Objectives

Students take courses in the following academic domains: Acupuncture, Chinese Medicine, General Science, Herbal Medicine, Biomedicine and Clinical Education.

Acupuncture Domain

ACM5220 Meridian Theory (3 Units)

This class will focus on the external and internal pathways and interrelationships among other channel systems, functions and pathological signs and symptoms of each channel. The twelve primary channels, eight extraordinary channels, twelve divergent channels, fifteen collaterals, twelve sinew channels, and six cutaneous regions will be covered.

ACM5221 Meridians and Points I (3 Units)

This course presents the points of the hand taiyin Lung channel, the hand yangming Large Intestine channel, the foot yangming Stomach channel, the foot taiyin Spleen channel, and the hand shaoyin Heart channel. Standards for proportional measurement will be covered as well. Points are located through comparative review of traditional and modern anatomy. Hands-on practice in locating points is emphasized; therapeutic indications and treatment methods utilizing acupuncture and moxibustion are discussed. Instruction is given in the functional selection of points through the application of differential diagnosis of conditions. The channels are studied following the circadian sequence of qi movement through the channels. This course prepares students for clinical practice by developing the skill to accurately locate points and the ability to understand and compose point combinations.

ACM5322 Meridians and Points II (3 Units)

This course presents the points of the hand taiyang Small Intestine channel, the foot taiyang Urinary Bladder channel, the foot shaoyin Kidney channel, the hand jueyin Pericardium channel, and the hand shaoyang San Jiao channel. Points are located through comparative review of traditional and modern anatomy. Hands-on practice in locating points is emphasized; therapeutic indications and treatment methods utilizing acupuncture and moxibustion are discussed. Instruction is given in the functional selection of points through the application of differential diagnosis of conditions. The channels are studied following the circadian sequence of qi movement through the channels. This course prepares students for clinical practice by developing the skill to accurately locate points and the ability to understand and compose point combinations.

ACM5424 Meridians and Points III (3 Units)

This course presents the points of the foot shaoyang Gall Bladder channel, foot jueyin Liver channel, du channel, ren channel and extra points. Points are located through comparative review of traditional and modern anatomy. Hands-on practice in locating points is emphasized; therapeutic indications and treatment methods utilizing acupuncture and moxibustion are discussed. Instruction is given in the functional selection of points through the application of differential diagnosis of conditions. The channels are studied following the circadian sequence of qi movement through the channels. This course prepares students for clinical practice by developing the skill to accurately locate points and the ability to understand and compose point combinations.

ACM6321 Meridians and Points Review (2 Units)

This course reviews the location of acupuncture points of the fourteen channels (twelve primary channels, du and ren channels), and common extra points by region. A review of anatomical landmarks, standards for proportional measurement and practical location skills of acupuncture points by channels and by body regions will be covered.

ACM5323 Acupuncture Technique I and CNT (3 Units)

This first course in acupuncture techniques is designed to introduce the three basic techniques of needling, moxibustion and cupping. Emphasizing safety and comfort, the students will learn to handle acupuncture needles, understand the use of different styles and sizes of needles and to learn to focus one's qi and intention in order to successfully implement the basic techniques of reinforcing and reducing. This course includes point preparation, angle and depth of insertion, and needle removal. Tonification and sedation needling techniques, moxibustion and cupping techniques are also taught. This course will provide foundational skills leading to competency to begin clinical practice. It is through the study of technique and the continuous review of point location, function and surface anatomy that clinical skill develops. Clean needle technique is taught, as well as how to handle acupuncture related clinical emergencies. This course fulfills the clean needle technique (CNT) requirement as required by California CCR Sections 1399.451 and 1399.454.

ACM5425 Acupuncture Technique II (3 Units)

This course provides students with a wide range of acupuncture treatment skills that serve as a foundation for the clinical practice phase of the program, and helps students develop confidence as practitioners. Students learn how to administer treatment by practicing point location and needling techniques on one another in preparation for treating patients in the clinic. Specialized acupuncture skills including pricking bleeding, through-and-through, seven-star needle, guasha and dermal tacks. Also advanced needling techniques, such as reinforcing/reducing techniques, and other classical techniques will be discussed and practiced. In each class meeting, it will start with a basic discussion of the related theory, and then half of the time will be hands-on practical training.

ACM6121 Acupuncture Technique III (3 Units)

This course introduces the practice of electro-acupuncture and the micro-systems of ear and scalp acupuncture. Students also continue to practice acupuncture skills introduced in the earlier courses. Students learn modern and classical needling techniques, including scalp acupuncture, auricular acupuncture and wrist-ankle acupuncture. Other adjunctive acupoint stimulation devices, including magnets, seeds and beads, and dermal tacks are also covered. Each class meeting will start with a basic discussion of the related theory (50% of class time). The remaining class time will be hands-on practical training.

ACM6122 Acupuncture Theory (3 Units)

This course will cover classical points categories. These categories are key to understanding the clinical application of acupuncture points. The categories are described in classical texts and denote groups of points with related therapeutic functions, as well as their clinical application presented in the modern literature. The categories that will be covered are the five shu, yuan-source, luo-connecting, xi-cleft, lower he-sea, influential, confluents, crossing, front-mu and back-shu points, as well as other point groups. The basic application of five-phase theory will also be covered.

ACM6223 Acupuncture Treatment for Diseases (3 Units)

This course presents the use of integrated approach of acupuncture therapy to treat diseases and conditions commonly encountered in the clinic setting. Disorders are described in terms of both Chinese medical and biomedical assessment, including disorders of cardiovascular, neurological, pulmonary, gastrointestinal, genitourinary, endocrine and EENT systems. Treatment principles and point prescriptions are developed based on an understanding of the Chinese medical assessment. Advanced treatment skills are developed, and adjunctive therapies to acupuncture are described. Hands-on practical sections will be included. The student has an opportunity to develop and implement a treatment plan for specific conditions.

ACM5421 Introduction to Tuina (3 Units)

This course covers the role of tuina as a form of Chinese physical medicine. The course covers the theory, history, application and specific tuina techniques. The course covers a variety of specific complaints such as neck and back pain and the management of these areas using specific tuina treatment protocols. The role of proper breathing and movement, as well as stretching exercises for both practitioner and client, is emphasized.

ACM5426 Introduction to Shiatsu (3 Units)

This course introduces the practice of Japanese medical shiatsu. Students learn various skills including manipulation of hands and fingers, channel palpation, massage, Hara diagnosis, patient self-care, and movement exercises. Students also learn Chinese medicine theory and philosophy, point selection, treatment principles and channel diagnosis as they relate to the practice of shiatsu. Students will be taught the information and skills necessary to begin confidently practicing a comprehensive, full-body, one-hour treatment.

Electives:

ACM5522 Advanced Tuina (2 Units)

This course provides advanced training in tuina techniques to injuries to the spine and joints, as well as other conditions. Specific physical examination and advanced tuina techniques are introduced for a variety of soft tissue injuries.

ACM5523 Advanced Tuina Practicum (2 Units)

This course is the practicum component for ACM5522 Advanced Tuina.

ACM5527 Shiatsu Therapeutics I (2 Units)

This course provides students with advanced training in shiatsu techniques, focusing on the treatment of common musculoskeletal disorders of the neck, shoulder, thorax and low back, from both Eastern and Western perspectives. Students receive advanced training in shiatsu therapy in a side-lying position, providing a practical foundation for the treatment of common disorders for the low back, pelvis, and lower extremities by focusing on physical assessment techniques, postural evaluation, and therapeutic modalities including positional release and muscle energy techniques.

ACM5528 Shiatsu Therapeutics II (2 Units)

This course reviews the shiatsu techniques presented in previous shiatsu courses and provides advanced training in therapeutic techniques. The course focuses on the treatment of common musculoskeletal disorders, useful treatment points, and therapeutic exercises. Students review techniques presented in the previous courses, as well as training in advanced therapeutic techniques. The class will focus on the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders caused by faulty posture. Therapeutic treatment techniques will include positional release, post-isometric relaxation, and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation with the goal of improving mobility and range of motion in chronically shortened muscles and connective tissue. Patient care plans, treatment goals, and patient training using facilitated stretching techniques will be introduced as part of a holistic treatment program.

ACM5529 Advanced Shiatsu Practicum (2 Units)

This course is the practicum component for Shiatsu Therapeutics. Students develop and expand clinic skills in providing shiatsu in the clinical setting. Students review assessment and treatment protocols for common musculoskeletal disorders. During each class there is a group discussion regarding problems that the student may have encountered, what worked well, what did not, and how to modify therapeutic techniques to better meet the individual needs of each patient.

ACM6421 Auricular Acupuncture (2 Units)

This course focuses on auricular acupuncture theory, point location and techniques. Students learn the physical structures of the pinna (external ear or auricle), locate auricular acupuncture points on the auricular surfaces, and learn the therapeutic and diagnostic applications of those auricular acupuncture points. Students learn how to assess patients and apply auricular acupuncture to specific disorders, both as an independent modality and in combination with channel-based acupuncture treatments. Both Chinese and Nogier auricular systems are covered.

ACM6522 Acupuncture for Musculoskeletal and Sports Injuries (3 Units)

This course is an introduction to the evaluation and treatment of musculoskeletal and sports injuries. Students will learn to assess, evaluate and treat musculoskeletal injuries based on channel theory and acupuncture principles. The course will cover specific needling techniques, point combinations, channel palpation, basic orthopedic assessment and herbal formulas.

ACM6621 Japanese Acupuncture Techniques (2 Units)

This course provides a survey of the fundamental theories of Japanese acupuncture as well as exposing students to Japanese acupuncture assessment and treatment techniques. Students are introduced to Japanese practices, such as "keiraku chiriyo" (channel therapy) and the work of Yoshio Manaka which incorporates abdominal diagnosis and the treatment of the extra channels.

ACM6622 Eight Extraordinary Channels (2 Units)

This course reviews the pathways, channel points, crossing points, energetics and associated symptom and sign complexes of the ren, du, chong, dai, yin wei, yang wei, yin qiao and yang qiao channels. The functions and indications, and their therapeutics for each channel are covered, as well as therapeutic options.

ACM7523 Acupuncture Study Elective (2 Units)

This course consists of the elective study of acupuncture theory, technique and clinical application of acupuncture, as well as advanced acupuncture studies. Students may register for Acupuncture Study Elective with approval of the Academic Dean.

Chinese Medicine Domain

ACM5111 History of Medicine (2 Units)

This course examines the nature of healing through an exploration of the origins and development of Chinese medicine from the perspective of the major Chinese philosophic traditions and scientific concepts. A survey of Chinese medical classics including Huang Di Nei Jing, Shang Han Lun, Jin Gui Yao Lue, Wen Bing and other major classics are presented. The histories of various traditional and alternative systems of Western medicine are also explored.

ACM5112 Clinical and Program Orientation (1 Unit)

This course provides an introduction to clinical practice and the responsibilities of working with patients in a health care setting, as well as understanding of higher education in acupuncture and Chinese medicine. The clinical policies and procedures, communicable diseases, clinical safety, professionalism, nature and value of a college education in relationship to one's intellectual development are covered. This class creates connections with peers, faculty and staff that support student academic success.

ACM5113 Medical Chinese (2 Units)

This course emphasizes terminology used to describe Chinese medicine concepts, as well as the recognition and understanding of philosophical aphorisms, acupuncture point names, Chinese herbal names, and common phrases of Chinese medicine. The pinyin romanization system, the tone system, some basic grammar structures and written characters are introduced.

ACM5110 Fundamental TCM Theory (4 Units)

This course introduces basic structures of Chinese medicine, the definitions and physiological functions of the qi/essence, yin/yang, five elements, qi/blood/body fluids, zang fu organs, and their dynamic interrelationships. The basic theory and characteristics of the pathogenesis and pathogenic factors are covered, including the six environmental factors, the seven emotions, disharmony of yin and yang, the eight principles and six-channel pattern identifications, and the abnormal functions of qi, blood, body fluid and organs. Additionally, organ pathogenesis is studied.

ACM5210 TCM Diagnosis I (3 Units)

This course introduces Chinese medical diagnosis, including inspection examination, listening and smelling examination and inquiry examination, and includes a detailed study of the diagnostic indexes of facial and tongue color. Diagnostic techniques are both described and demonstrated. World Health Organization international classification of diseases (ICD-9 codes) is also introduced. Students begin to develop skills in clinical reasoning and problem solving with the techniques covered.

ACM5311 TCM Diagnosis II (3 Units)

This course discusses palpation examination in Chinese medical diagnosis with an emphasis of the pulse diagnosis. Special emphasis is placed on eight principle differentiation, qi blood and body fluids identification. There is an introduction to diagnostic theory in Chinese medicine. Diagnostic techniques are both described and demonstrated. Students begin to develop skills in clinical reasoning and problem solving with the techniques covered.

ACM5412 TCM Diagnosis III (3 Units)

This course presents Chinese medical diagnostic theories based on zang fu organ pattern differentiation, six channel differentiation, four level differentiation and san jiao differentiation. Diagnostic techniques are both described and demonstrated. Students begin to develop skills in clinical reasoning and problem solving with the techniques covered.

ACM5313 Qi Gong (1 Unit)

Qi gong is an ancient Chinese energetic art whose aim is to cultivate health by restoring the healthy movement of qi. This course provides students an experiential awareness of energy pathways and flow in the body through an introduction of the Taiyi Swimming Dragon family style of qi gong. Students participate in simple movements to clear channels and activate energy centers, and learn a variety of qi gong methods to assist traditional ways of diagnosis and treatment. In addition to the movement/meditation component of this class, the cultural and historic context of qi gong in relation to traditional notions of health, ritual and everyday work are covered.

ACM5114 Tai Ji Quan (1 Unit)

Tai ji quan is a meditative martial art that consists of a set of individual poses that are performed consecutively as a single, fluid form. The objective of tai ji quan is to enable the practitioner to guide the flow of qi in and through the body through slow, focused movement. In this course, students will learn the Wu style of tai ji quan while becoming more aware of the flow of qi. All classes include: 1) standing meditation or remedial exercises, 2) verbal explanations of method and theory, 3) visual demonstrations, 4) opportunities to follow along, and 5) working in partners or with small groups to develop sensitivity and receive direct feedback.

ACM6412 TCM Nutrition (2 Units)

This course presents general concepts for the use of nutrition as a treatment modality in Chinese medicine. The assessment of symptoms and signs for various patterns are reviewed, and nutritional approaches to treatment are presented, including herbal stews and soups. Chinese medicinal nutrition is based on Chinese medical theory. The use of foods and natural nutritional products are employed to maintain health, both prevent and treat disease, foster rehabilitation, and to slow the aging process.

ACM7211 TCM Gynecology (3 Units)

This course covers the diagnosis and treatment of abnormal menstruation, pregnancy complications, sterility, fibroid tumors and vaginal discharge, and presents case studies for discussion. Chinese medical gynecology is introduced. The menstrual cycle is described in order to optimize treatment based on differentiation of the phases of ovulation and menstruation. Disorders of the female reproductive system are described as well as Chinese medical treatment. Assessment and therapeutics are described in terms of qi, blood and body fluids, extraordinary channels, as well as zang fu organ differentiation. Pathologies are differentiated in terms of etiology, pattern of disharmony, treatment principle and acupuncture and herbal treatment.

ACM7213 Clinical Case Review and Management (3 Units)

This course provides a structure for students to develop case reports and case presentations, as well as an opportunity to discuss clinical cases in groups. This course introduces clinical case review and management in a clinical setting, including history taking, data collection from subjective findings and objective findings, case assessment, treatment plan and treatment outcomes, analyzing data to modify patient care and continuity of care, follow-up care and clinical outcomes, prognosis and future medical care, referral and risk management, emergency procedures, as well as collaboration with other healthcare providers. Case analysis and presentation skills are emphasized.

ACM7318 AOM Comprehensive Review (2 Units)

This course provides a comprehensive review of the acupuncture and Chinese medicine program, including the fundamental theory of Chinese medicine, diagnosis, internal medicine, acupuncture theory including point location and the indication of points, acupuncture techniques, Chinese materia medica and herbal formulas. This course includes case studies and self-tests that reinforce and refresh the understanding and memory of essential of the program.

Electives:

ACM7111 TCM Oncology (2 Units)

This course presents the etiology and pathology of selected cancers from both Chinese medicine and Western medicine viewpoints. Students will be introduced to caner-related Western medicine. Students will learn how to integrate a variety of Chinese medicine modalities (acupuncture, herbs, diet and qi gong) to support patients undergoing conventional cancer care. The ethics pertaining to treating cancer patients will be discussed. Utilizing case studies student will become more confident and comfortable treating patients with cancer in the clinical setting.

ACM7512 TCM Dermatology (2 Units)

This course introduces the treatment of common skin disorders according to both Chinese medicine and western disease categorizations. The etiology, pathogenesis, syndrome differentiation, and acupuncture and herbal treatments are covered. Dermatological conditions are covered with respect to syndrome differentiation and treatment principles.

ACM7513 TCM Pediatrics (2 Units)

This course provides an introduction to the theories, principles and practices of Chinese medical pediatrics, primarily from a five phase perspective, including child development, assessment, and the treatment/management of common childhood disorders with acupuncture, herbal medicine, nutritional and dietary therapies.

ACM7511 TCM Classics: Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen (2 Units)

This course examines the history, development and role of the Huang Di Nei Jing Su Wen (Yellow Emperor's Inner Classic-Simple Questions, 黄帝内经素問) as a classic text of Chinese medicine. The organization of the text and the articulation of basic theories of Chinese medicine are examined from the context of a classical Han Dynasty text. Students will consider the Su Wen from the perspective of modern practitioners and examine how the ideas in the Su Wen illuminate contemporary Chinese medicine.

Herbal Medicine Domain

ACM5230 TCM Materia Medica I (3 Units)

Herbs are divided into functional categories and are studied with regard to unique and common characteristics. This course introduces herbs that release the exterior, herbs that clear heat and drain fire, herbs that clear heat and cool blood, and herbs that clear heat and dry dampness, herbs that clear heat and toxins, herbs that clear heat from deficiency, and herbs that drain downward. Students are introduced to the characteristics of the herbs, including their Chinese names (pin yin), nature, entering channels, therapeutic functions and contraindications. This course in the series covers the history and development of the Chinese pharmacopoeia, herb processing and dosage as well.

ACM5331 TCM Materia Medica II (3 Units)

Herbs are divided into functional categories and are studied with regard to unique and common characteristics. This course introduces herbs that expel wind dampness, herbs that aromatically transform dampness, herbs that drain dampness, herbs that warm the interior and expel cold, herbs that regulate qi, herbs that relieve food stagnation, herbs that expel parasites, herbs that stop bleeding, and herbs that invigorate the blood. Students are introduced to the characteristics of the herbs, including their Chinese names (pinyin), nature, entering channels, therapeutic functions and contraindications.

ACM5432 TCM Materia Medica III (3 Units)

Herbs are divided into functional categories and are studied with regard to unique and common characteristics. This course introduces herbs that transform phlegm, herbs that relieve coughing and wheezing, herbs that calm the spirit, herbs that aromatically open the orifices, herbs that extinguish wind and stop tremors, herbs that tonify the qi and blood, herbs that tonify the yin and yang, and herbs that stabilize and bind. Students are introduced to the characteristics of the herbs, including their Chinese names (pinyin), nature, entering channels, therapeutic functions and contraindications.

ACM6131 TCM Formulary I (3 Units)

This course introduces the following formula categories: formulas that release the exterior, formulas that drain downward, formulas that harmonize, and formulas that clear heat. Formulas are reviewed in the context of the component herbs, therapeutic function, indications, treatment principles and information on the classical organization of ingredients. Also covered are the applications of herbal formula prescriptions and herbal counseling to specific diseases and how to modify formulas based on patient condition and disease course.

ACM6232 TCM Formulary II (3 Units)

This course introduces the following formula categories: formulas that warm interior cold, formulas that tonify, formulas that calm the spirit, formulas that stabilize and bind, and formulas that regulate the qi. Formulas are reviewed in the context of the component herbs, therapeutic function, indications, treatment principles and information on the classical organization of ingredients. Also covered are the applications of herbal formula prescriptions and herbal counseling to specific diseases and how to modify formulas based on patient condition and disease course.

ACM6333 TCM Formulary III (3 Units)

This course introduces the following formula categories: formulas that regulate the blood, formulas that expel wind, formulas that treat dryness, formulas that expel dampness, formulas that treat phlegm, formulas that reduce food stagnation, and formulas that expel parasites. Formulas are reviewed in the context of the component herbs, therapeutic function, indications, treatment principles and information on the classical organization of ingredients. Also covered are the applications of herbal formula prescriptions and herbal counseling to specific diseases and how to modify formulas based on patient condition and disease course.

ACM6434 Paten Medicine (2 Units)

This course reviews traditional Chinese herbal formulas prepared as "patent medicines." The recognition of symptom/sign complexes in diseases common to clinical practice, and the therapeutic function and organization of each patent formula is discussed. A number of patent medicines are surveyed, including pills, syrups, salves, balms, plasters, powders, and medicinal wines.

ACM7141 Drug and Herb Interactions (1 Unit)

This course provides the introductory information to recognize the herb-drug interactions among commonly used herbs and drugs. The current understanding of how herbs and drugs interacting are discussed in the context of clinical practice and the available information. Select herbs and drugs are reviewed with an eye to enhancing clinical safety. Contraindicated herb-drug combinations are discussed as well as the evidence for this conclusion.

ACM6235 TCM Internal Medicine I (3 Units)

This course focuses on differential diagnosis and treatment strategies to treat specific disorders. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of case studies using Chinese medical theory in order to select the best acupuncture treatment and herbal formulas. In this course the general methods of Chinese medical treatment are reviewed, as well as the management of headache (tou tong), dizziness (tou yun), tinnitus and deafness (er ming er long), bi syndrome (bi zheng), low back pain (yao tong) and other pain conditions, stiff neck (luo zhen), facial paralysis (mian tan), wei syndrome (wei zheng), insomnia (shi mian), palpitations (xin ji), running piglet qi (ben tun qi), depression (yu zheng), wind-stroke (zhong feng), hypochondriac pain (xie tong), jaundice (huang dan), fainting (jue zheng), edema (shui zhong), drum distension (gu zhang) and sweat disorder (han bing).

ACM6336 TCM Internal Medicine II (3 Units)

This course focuses on differential diagnosis and treatment strategies to treat specific disorders. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of case studies using Chinese medical theory in order to select the best acupuncture treatment and herbal formulas. In this course the following conditions are covered: wasting and thirsting syndrome (xiao ke), convulsive disorder (jing zheng), urine retention (long bi), lung consumptive disorder (fei lao), chest pain (xiong bi), painful urination (lin zheng), phlegm-fluid retention (tan yin), sudden turmoil disorder (huo luan), bleeding disorders (xue zheng), fever (fa re), common cold (gan mao), wind febrile disorder (feng wen), damp febrile disorder (shi wen), dry febrile disorder (qiu zao), cough (ke sou), asthma (xiao zheng), dyspnea (chuan zheng), lung abscess (fei yong), hiccup (e ni), vomiting (ou tu) and difficulty swallowing (ye ge).

ACM6437 TCM Internal Medicine III (3 Units)

This course focuses on differential diagnosis and treatment strategies to treat specific disorders. An emphasis is placed on the analysis of case studies using Chinese medical theory in order to select the best acupuncture treatment and herbal formulas. In this course the following conditions are covered: stomach pain (wei tong), abdominal pain (fu tong), constipation (bian mi), diarrhea (xie xie), dysentery (li ji), intestinal abscess (chang yong), loss of consciousness (shen hun), mental/emotional disorders (dian kuang), memory loss (jian wang), seizure disorders (xian zheng), enuresis (yi niao), disorders of ejaculation (yi jing, zao xie), erectile dysfunction (yang wei), infertility (bu yu), masses (ji ju), goiter (ying liu), phlegm disorder (tan bing), blood stasis (xue yu bing) and consumptive disease (xu lao).

ACM7231 TCM Classics: Shang Han Lun (2 Units)

This course presents the differentiation and treatment of disease based on the patterns (taiyang, yangming, shaoyang, shaoyin, taiyin and jueyin) presented in the Chinese medicine classic Shang Han Lun (伤寒论 or Shang Han Za Bing Lun 伤寒杂病论), known in English as the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders or the Treatise on Cold Injury. This is a Chinese medical treatise compiled by Zhang Zhongjing during the Eastern Han dynasty (25-220 ACE).

ACM6532 TCM Classics: Wen Bing (2 Units)

This course covers the most important concepts of the Wen Bing School of Chinese medicine, and to convey how these can be used in understanding and treating disease. Topics discussed in this course include the historical development of the Wen Bing Xue, a description of the etiology, onset, and pathogenesis of disease according to wen bing, and diagnostic and treatment methods. The four stages (wei, qi, ying, xue) are differentiated. Seven types of warm pathogen disease are discussed, including wind-warmth (feng wen), spring-warmth (chuan wen), autumn-dryness (qiu zao), warm-toxin (wen du), summer-heat-warmth (shu wen), damp-warmth (shi wen), and lurking summer-heat (fu shu).

Electives:

ACM7133 TCM Classics: Jin Gui Yao Lue (2 Units)

This course covers the formulas presented in the Han Dynasty classic Jin Gui Yao Lue is known in English as the Synopsis of Prescriptions of the Golden Chamber. It is a Chinese medical treatise compiled by Zhang Zhongjing during the Eastern Han dynasty (25-220 ACE). Formulas are differentiated based on content, indications and treatment principles.

ACM7532 TCM Classics: Shang Han Lun Practicum (2 Units)

This course deepens student understanding of the Shang Han Lun through observation of cases in a clinic theater structure, with discussion of pattern differentiation, treatment principles and the application of formulas based on the Shang Han Lun. While this is an observational experience students are expected to come prepared to discuss in depth six level assessment and treatment based on the observation of clinical cases.

ACM7535 TCM Classics: Pi Wei Lun (2 Units)

Pi wei doctrine is part of the Jin Yuan Four Schools in Chinese medical history. Li Dong-yuan (1180-1251 ACE) was the founder of the tonifying the earth school (bu tu pai). The course will introduce the basic theories of pi wei doctrine, Li Dong­yuan's theories and treatments for internal damage (nei shang), spleen and stomach problems and the concept of yin fire. The course also will discuss the clinical applications using the middle jiao theories.

ACM7536 Chinese Herbal Medicine Study Elective (2 Units)

This course consists of the elective study of Chinese herbal medicine, including materia medica, formulas, Chinese internal medicine, as well as advanced herbal studies. Students may register for Chinese Herbal Medicine Study Elective with approval of the Academic Dean.

Biomedicine Domain

ACM4041 General Chemistry (2 Units)

This course presents an introduction to the elementary principles of general chemistry as well as organic and biochemistry. Basic concepts are presented with a view to developing later coursework in physiology and pathophysiology.

ACM4042 General Biology (2 Units)

This course presents the foundational principles of biology, including concepts of structure and function, reproduction, development, heredity and evolution. Ideas of modern biology impacting the human species are included, such as ecology and recombinant DNA research.

ACM4043 General Psychology (2 Units)

This course is a general overview of psychology for students of acupuncture and Chinese medicine. It focuses on areas of psychology which provide Chinese medicine practitioners a basic knowledge in the mental health field in order to communicate effectively with other health professionals. This class presents the major philosophies of psychology, as well as the basic clinical conditions most likely to arise in acupuncture practice. Essential to this class is the development of an understanding of when, and to whom, it might be useful to refer patients. The class also emphasizes the mind-body connection, the psychology of stress, and psychological impacts of medical illness. Experiential exercises designed to enhance clinical interviewing skills to gain skillful communication methodologies and specific counseling techniques will also be included.

ACM4045 General Physics (2 Units)

This course introduces the fundamental laws of physics and provides an introduction to the topics of mechanics, heat, sound and light, as well as electricity, magnetism, atoms and modern biophysics. Concepts are presented to develop a framework for understanding the basic forces that impact daily life.

ACM5140 Medical Terminology (1 Unit)

This course introduces students to Western medical terminology used to describe body structures, surgical, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures, symptoms and diseases. The course focuses on the component parts of medical terms: prefixes, suffixes and root words. There is an emphasis on definitions, spelling and pronunciation. Upon course completion, students should be proficient in comprehending basic medical documents and discussions.

ACM5143 Surface Anatomy (1 Unit)

This course introduces the anatomy of the human body as discovered through palpation. Major landmarks are described and related to interior anatomical structures. The course emphasizes key landmarks that are used in acupuncture point location and physical assessment.

ACM5141 Human Anatomy I (2 Units)

This course systematically presents morphology of the human body. Topics presented include anatomical structures, terminology, organization, movement and biomechanics of the science of anatomy, methods used to study anatomy, and anatomy terminology. This course explores the integumentary system and the motor system, including the skeletal, muscular, nervous systems and neuroanatomy.

ACM5242 Human Anatomy II (2 Units)

This course systematically presents the macro and microstructure of the human body. The class emphasizes internal visceral structures of the science of anatomy, methods used to study anatomy, and anatomy terminology. This course explores sensory organs, circulatory system, lymphatic and immune systems, respiratory system, digestive system, urinary system, reproductive system and endocrine system.

ACM6141 Human Physiology (3 Units)

This course introduces human physiology, including concepts of homeostasis and regulation of physiological function. Additionally, concepts of pain physiology, neurophysiology, neurochemistry and the physiology of acupuncture are described. Emphasis is placed on material that will be directly beneficial for future understanding of pathology and pathophysiology in the context of relevant of coursework in western clinical medicine.

ACM6241 Pathology and Pathophysiology (3 Units)

This course covers the pathology and pathophysiology correlations of human disease. Concepts include general pathology and epidemiology, including cellular pathology, inflammation, immunopathology, neoplasia, genetic and developmental disorders, and fluid and hemodynamic disorders. Next, the structural and functional changes during diseases of each organ system are covered. The course emphasizes nervous, musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, respiratory, hematopoietic, lymphoid, digestive, endocrine and genitourinary systems.

ACM6342 Physical Assessment (2 Units)

This course provides experience in medical history taking, proper written documentation, and physical examination. The class content will focus on general physical screening and assessment to guide treatment and to determine appropriate referrals to other healthcare providers when indicated.

ACM6443 Advanced Physical Assessment (2 Units)

This course provides experience in musculoskeletal, orthopedic and neurologic physical examination. Procedures for ordering diagnostic imaging, radiological and laboratory tests, and their clinical application will also be introduced. The course contents will focus on clinical differential assessment in order to guide treatment and to determine appropriate referrals to other healthcare providers when indicated.

ACM6441 Western Clinical Medicine I (3 Units)

This course introduces the basic concepts of biomedical practice, including history taking, physical exam and diagnostic testing including radiological imaging, treatment methods, and treatment contraindications and complications. The primary care responsibilities, and secondary and specialty care responsibilities are also introduced. The western clinical perspective review on internal medicine and surgery on cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary diseases, microbiology and infectious diseases, oncology, disorders of the ears, nose and throat, as well as gastrointestinal disorders and hepatobiliary disorders are discussed.

ACM6542 Western Clinical Medicine II (3 Units)

This course introduces the basic concepts of biomedical practice, including history taking, physical exam and diagnostic testing including radiological imaging, treatment methods, and treatment contraindications and complications. The primary care responsibilities, and secondary and specialty care responsibilities are also introduced. The western clinical perspective review on internal medicine and surgery on hematological disorders, endocrine disorders, neurological disorders, psychiatric disorders and psychopathology, musculoskeletal disorders, disorders due to physical agents, hospice care, dermatological disorders, urinary and renal disorders, disorders of the urogenital system (urology) and sexually transmitted diseases are discussed.

ACM7145 Western Gynecology (2 Units)

This course provides an overview of the biomedical perspective on gynecology and obstetrics, including diagnosis and treatment. The course focuses on well-woman care, gynecological pathology, the menstrual cycle, menopause, sexually transmitted diseases, normal pregnancy and pregnancy complications. The primary care responsibilities, and secondary and specialty care responsibilities are also introduced.

ACM7142 Pharmacology (2 Units)

This course introduces the concepts of pharmaceutical treatment, including the mechanism and kinetics of drug action and an overview of major drug categories. Common medications are discussed, including their pharmaceutical names, actions, indications, side effects, and potential adverse reactions and interactions with herbs.

ACM6543 Diet and Nutrition (2 Units)

This course reviews the basic concepts of biomedical nutrition, including the building blocks of nutrition and the role of various food groups in nutrition, Special dietary needs, nutritional supplements and dietary counseling are also covered. The role of diet in health and disease is emphasized.

ACM7345 Public Health (2 Units)

This course explores the cultural and environmental issues that contribute to health and illness in our society. Topics include the economics of our health care system, epidemiology, how the socio-economics of individuals influences health care, world health, disease prevention, and awareness of at-risk population. This class explores the ways in which TCM practitioners interface with, and are affected by, the public health system in the USA. The class also focuses on the specific issue of chemical dependency.

ACM6346 Patient Management and Ethics (2 Units)

This course introduces concepts in the area of patient-centered interactions and provides students with a range of communication skills important in working with patients, including multicultural sensitivity. Ethical issues that may arise in the practice of acupuncture are described, as well as how to address them effectively. Psychosocial assessment in substance abuse, anxiety and depression, and aging and dying is also covered. This course is designed to help student practitioners create and maintain relationships with patients in order to maximize the efficacy and healing potential of TCM modalities.

ACM7243 Research Methods (2 Units)

This course introduces the fundamental principles of research and evidence based medicine, with emphasis on clinical trials. Students will review a variety of published research studies in the acupuncture and traditional medicine field, and will compare their strengths and limitations. This course provides a foundation in research methodology to enable students to read and critique the medical literature. The course provides foundations for asking research questions and designing studies to answer those questions.

ACM6245 Business Practices and Marketing (2 Units)

This course prepares the student for the business aspects of running an acupuncture practice. The emphasis of this course is on the development of the building blocks of a strong business plan. At the same time, legal and ethical considerations to practicing in the health care model are considered. Finally, the financial obligations of owning a business are examined.

ACM6545 Practice Management (2 Units)

This course provides students with the information they need to apply their acupuncture training skills in a business-like manner in a variety of clinical settings. The emphasis is on a practical application of business and professional skills and information necessary to provide acupuncture health care.

Electives:

ACM5142 Literature Research (2 Units)

This course introduces the techniques for assessing research literature, as well as teaching the basic concepts of research methodology. The course also provides students how to use of the library and online research, Boolean research and the evaluation of research literature. Students will conduct literature searches and develop bibliographies related to research topics.

ACM7541 Biomedical Study Elective (1 Unit)

This course consists of the study of subjects in biomedicine, including anatomy, physiology, pathology and pathophysiology and Western clinical medicine, as well as advanced biomedical studies. Students may register for Biomedical Study Elective with approval of the Academic Dean.

Clinical Education Domain

ACM5250 Clinic Observation I/ Clinic Theater (2 Units)

Students observe patient care provided by an ACTCM clinic supervisor who is a licensed acupuncturist. Students observe the interaction between patient and practitioner, including patient intake, differential diagnosis, points and herbal prescriptions, bedside manner, time management, and OSHA and HIPAA requirements. Topics to be covered are professional conduct, acupuncture regulations, history taking and charting, treatment include acupuncture and herbal medicine, and the role of the observer in the clinic.

ACM5351 and ACM5452 Clinic Observation II (4 Units)

These two courses allow students to observe patient care in the college's clinic or a preceptor observation site. Students observer patient care and may have the opportunity to assess tongue and pulse. Students continue to observe the provider's greeting and intake, pulse palpation, tongue and face inspection, diagnosis and treatment, charting, and the clean needle technique procedures within the clinic setting. Students also have the opportunity to discuss cases and treatment strategies with the provider.

ACM6151 and ACM6152 Clinic Trainee I (4 Units)

In these two clinical courses, students begin to transition from observing patients to treating them under the direct supervision of a clinical supervisor, who is physically present to observe all patient interactions. Students are responsible for greeting the patient, explaining their role, taking a history and formulating a diagnosis. They also propose to the supervisor a combination of acupuncture points, a specific herbal formula, and other adjunctive therapies that might be useful. After the clinical supervisor reviews the diagnosis and approves the treatment strategy, the student clinician treats the patient under direct supervision.

ACM6253 and ACM6354 Clinic Trainee II (4 Units)

In these two clinical courses, student clinicians develop a higher level of autonomy by assuming more responsibility for the clinical process. Under direct supervision of the clinical supervisor, students conduct the clinical intake, diagnosis, charting and treatment of patients. Trainee II student clinicians are expected to demonstrate a higher level of competency as they begin to independently develop an assessment and treatment plan

ACM6455 Clinic Trainee III (2 Units)

Student clinicians continue to develop and refine the skills practiced in the Trainee I and II levels, and assume additional responsibilities at the discretion of the attending clinical supervisor. The clinical supervisor continues to be physically present in the treatment room during diagnosis and treatment of patients, approves the entire treatment, and provides guidance as needed. This phase of clinical studies is the preparation for the intern phase, when students function with greater autonomy in caring for patients.

ACM6551 and ACM6552 Clinic Intern I (4 Units)

During these two clinical courses, students progress from working in trainee to assuming individual responsibility for patients. The student intern greets the patient, explains his or her role, takes a history, and proposes to the clinical supervisor a prescription of acupuncture points, an herbal remedy and/or other adjunct therapies such as cupping, moxabustion or tuina. The student is also responsible for discussing the treatment plan with the patient, administering the complete treatment, and filling the herbal formula. Before the student initiates the treatment, the clinical supervisor examines the patient, and reviews the diagnosis and treatment plan; he or she also observes the insertion of the acupuncture needles and other procedures as needed to ensure proper treatment.

ACM7153, ACM7154, ACM7255 and ACM7256 Clinic Intern II (8 Units)

These four clinical courses are designed to further increase the student intern's level of autonomy and confidence as he or she moves to the next level and assumes a greater range of clinical responsibilities. Students continue to treat patients individually and administer the complete treatment process under the supervision of clinical supervisors, who observe and provide guidance as necessary.

ACM7357 and ACM7358 Clinic Intern III (4 Units)

These two clinical courses are designed to further increase the student intern's level of autonomy and confidence as he or she moves to the next level and assumes a greater range of clinical responsibilities. Students continue to treat patients individually and administer the complete treatment process under the supervision of clinical supervisors, who observe and provide guidance as necessary.

Stay Connected