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Anthropology and Social Change Info Session

April  22, 2014
6:00 pm - 7:00 pm

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Anthropology and Social Change Info Session

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Founded in 1981, the Anthropology program offers a critical, advocacy approach to education. In 1997, the program expanded to include a doctoral track. In 1999, the program was re-envisioned to prioritize issues of social and ecological justice in the context of a multicultural, postcolonial world. In 2012, the program was again re-envisioned to support and develop the knowledge generated by contemporary social movements, with a particular emphasis on struggles that engage critically with capitalist globalization and that prefigure alternative practices.
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System Requirements

PC-based attendees
Windows® 8, 7, Vista, XP or 2003 Server

Mac-based attendees
Mac OS X 10.6 or newer

Mobile attendees
iPhone, iPad, Android phone or Android tablet

Online Info Session

 
 

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Anthropology and Social Change MA and PhD Programs

Anthropology and Social Change MA and PhD Programs

Our understanding of the integral mission of the Institute is distinctive in several key aspects. First, we attempt to integrate worlds of academic and grassroots knowledge. We believe that universities and social sciences are, for the most part, isolated from new practices and new movements, as they keep insisting on concepts and theories that are not adequate to new realities of creation and resistance. On the other side of this gap, activists are in serious need of new theories: theoretical knowledge (s) that can assist them in reflecting analytically on their practices, methods, and strategies for social change. At a moment when education is more then ever in danger of becoming enclosed and commodified, we have an urgent responsibility to defend universities as autonomous and critical places of knowledge production.