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A Conversation with Argentinian Activist Nora Cortinas

March  5 - 5, 2014
7:00 pm - 8:15 pm

Anthropology and Social Change   

 

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A Conversation with Argentinian Activist Nora Cortinas

Cortiñas is Founding Member/Spokesperson of Asociación Madres De Plaza De Mayo (Línea Fundadora)


FREE Wednesday, March 5th 7PM/ Area 5 (Fifth Floor)/ 1453 Mission Street

Internationally renowned human rights activist Nora Cortiñas will introduce the current work of Asociación Madres De Plaza De Mayo (Línea Fundadora) and their resistance against state terrorism in her native Argentina, linking indigenous rights and the rights of ethnic minorities internationally together with the struggle against extractionist practices and GMO corporations. Her introduction will be followed by a Q & A conversation.

Nora Cortiñas is a human rights activist in Argentina and co-founder of Asociación Madres De Plaza De Mayo (Línea Fundadora) which has been working for over 35 years to learn about the fate of their disappeared relatives during Argentina's Dirty War and to seek justice for the 30,000 who were arrested, tortured and disappeared by the military dictatorship. She is a social psychologist and professor at the Faculty of Economics of the University of Buenos Aires and widely recognized for her life's work in defense of economic and social rights of Argentinian peoples.

With a special thanks to Roberto Gutierrez Verea and the Center for Latino Studies in the Americas (CELASA) at USF for sponsoring Nora Cortiñas Bay Area visit.

AREA 5 (5th Floor), California Institute of Integral Studies
1453 Mission Street, San Francisco, CA 94103

 
 

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Our understanding of the integral mission of the Institute is distinctive in several key aspects. First, we attempt to integrate worlds of academic and grassroots knowledge. We believe that universities and social sciences are, for the most part, isolated from new practices and new movements, as they keep insisting on concepts and theories that are not adequate to new realities of creation and resistance. On the other side of this gap, activists are in serious need of new theories: theoretical knowledge (s) that can assist them in reflecting analytically on their practices, methods, and strategies for social change. At a moment when education is more then ever in danger of becoming enclosed and commodified, we have an urgent responsibility to defend universities as autonomous and critical places of knowledge production.