EWP Student Learning Outcomes

October, 2010

M.A. Program

Goal 1. To have a critical understanding of the main contemporary approaches to the Eastern, Western, and indigenous encounter in psychology and spirituality. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Demonstrate foundational knowledge in at least three East-West psychological approaches (e.g., transpersonal psychology, depth psychology, consciousness studies) and several spiritual traditions (e.g., Advaita Vedanta, Buddhism, shamanism).
  • Objective 2. Demonstrate in-depth knowledge in a selected area of specialization within East-West studies.
  • Objective 3. Describe, analyze, critique, compare, and integrate knowledge from a variety of Eastern, Western, and indigenous psychological and spiritual traditions.
  • Objective 4. Apply critical thinking in relation to basic issues of East-West cross-cultural hermeneutics, such as orientalism, universalism, or pluralism.

Goal 2. To become competent in a variety of dialogical, writing, inquiry, and socially engaged skills. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Practice respectful dialogue and fruitful collective and collaborative inquiry.
  • Objective 2. Apply East-West psycho-spiritual perspectives to one or more socially engaged pursuits (e.g., community activism, ecopsychology, spiritual counseling).
  • Objective 3. Write academic papers integrating scholarly sources with their own embodied perspectives and informed opinions.
  • Objective 4. Incorporate somatic, vital, emotional, imaginal, and spiritual experience and knowledge in their scholarly approach to the academic content of the program.

Goal 3. To understand the dynamics of psycho-spiritual development and their relevance for personal growth. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Demonstrate knowledge of main psycho-spiritual developmental models, issues, and processes.
  • Objective 2. Show proficiency in the practice of at least one psycho-spiritual discipline.
  • Objective 3. Apply psycho-spiritual understanding to theirs and others' personal development.

Goal 4. To be prepared to work professionally as college teachers, writers, consultants, workshop leaders, spiritual counselors, social change activists, and/or community organizers Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Demonstrate professional skills corresponding to their chosen career path.
  • Objective 2. Design a concrete and sustainable professional plan.

     

Ph.D. Program

Goal 1. To produce original scholarly works in the field of East-West psychology and spirituality. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Demonstrate comprehensive knowledge and expertise in a selected area of specialization within East-West studies.
  • Objective 2. Produce work that creatively and critically interprets, compares, integrates, applies, and/or evaluates knowledge from a variety of Eastern, Western, and indigenous psychological and spiritual traditions.
  • Objective 3. Apply critical thinking in relation to basic and complex issues of East-West cross-cultural hermeneutics, such as orientalism, ethnocentrism, critical pluralism, insider/outsider perspectives, relativism, and/or incommensurability.

Goal 2. To carry out scholarly research with a methodology appropriate to their research interests. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Design cogent, feasible, and methodologically rigorous research projects.
  • Objective 2. Apply several qualitative and theoretical research methods (e.g., phenomenological, hermeneutic, heuristic, narrative, comparative) to their research interests.
  • Objective 3. Carry out a complete research project that demonstrates professional methodological knowledge and skills.

Goal 3. To be competent in a variety of pedagogical, writing, and inquiry skills. Students will be able to:

  • Objective 1. Present verbally their scholarly works and research projects with professionalism, clarity, precision, and creativity.
  • Objective 2. Write original research papers and books according to professional scholarly standards.
  • Objective 3. Incorporate somatic, vital, emotional, imaginal, and spiritual experience and knowledge into scholarly practices, such as research and writing.